France, Sept 9, 1917

Dear Emma;-

Your letter of Sept. 2 came yesterday. I wish they would not spend so long on the road. How many days does it take my letters to reach you? You never refer to any of them by date, or at least very seldom, and I can never be sure of which letter you have last received.

Had a letter from my sister yesterday. She said I owed her a letter and was just writing to remind me of the fact. She had been on night duty but was hoping to soon be relieved. They were not enjoying the moonlight nights, for the Huns were using them for bomb dropping expeditions against the hospitals. Margaret said she had previously never thought she would dislike moonlight. I wish the C.C.S. she is with would move down a little near to our corps.

You mentioned your frequent interruptions while writing. The other officers are away to a shooting competition this afternoon and I have the mess table to myself for writing. Usually we consider ourselves lucky to even have a table to upon which to do our writing. When we are out of the line the gramophone is usually going during letter writing time.

Life is going along like one grand sweet song for me just now. I have scarcely a worry or care. The sick parades are not heavy and the men are keeping the camp and billets in the most scrupulous condition. The only jarring note to day is the fact that I had to put a man with a sore leg under arrest for “Talking back” on sick parade this morning. He will come up for his medicine to morrow morning.

Why are you going in for buying linen and other junk? You will only have a load of it on your hands and as you know the future is a mighty uncertain quantity so long as the war lasts. It may be months yet before I can get my leave. And then we do not know how long we shall live in England after the war. We may be returning to Canada at once or may not. Altogether “After the war” speculations are most inopportune. Most certainly announcements could not be sent until everything was concluded, but I understood that they should be ready to mail very shortly afterwards. However, that is a minor matter.

I am afraid this is not a very pleasant letter but please know that I love you every minute of the day.

Yours always

Harold W McGill

Please give my kind regards to Miss Reid.

HWMcG

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  1. […] France, Sept 9, 1917 January 22nd, 2007 by AutoAggregator Dear Emma;- Your letter of Sept. 2 came yesterday. I wish they would not spend so long on the road. How many days does it take my letters to reach you? You never refer to any of them by date, or at least very seldom, and I can never be sure of… […]


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