France, March 26, 1918

Dear Emma;-

I was made very happy this afternoon by the receipt of four letters from you, dated March 18, 19, 20 and 21 respectively. You dear girl, you are certainly a glorious letter writer and I only wish the A.P.O. could use a little more expedition in the delivery of the mail from England.

I am very very pleased to have the snap shots. Thank you ever so much. I like the one with the hat on best. For some reason you are alone and I like to sit and look at only you. Do you remember there always seemed to be a crowd around when we were together last time?

Pardon me if I do not answer all your questions in this epistle. For one thing I have not much time for writing and I wish to read all your letters a few more times before I really answer them. I was busy and missed getting this written before the mail went out to night and now I do not know when it will be posted. First of all, Emmie dear, I do not wish you to go home to Canada unless it is a case of urgent necessity. Of course, if conditions get much worse in England it might be advisable for you to do so but I would be very very lonesome with you so far away. You seem particularly near and dear to me in the anxious and troubled times through which we are now passing.

You know of course that all leave is cancelled until further notice. That probably means that there will not be any more until the enemy offensive is checked – and we do not know how long this heavy fighting will last or how it will end. The noise of the artillery has not been so loud to day as it has been for some time previously. I have not seen Margaret for the past two days and am not sure than her unit has not moved or is about to move away. I would be just as well pleased to see her a little further behind the firing line, especially in these times of great activity.

Now if I should not be permitted to return to my dearly love wife again I wish you to carry on and do what you can to help win the war, for it must be won. My will is with Belord & Co, Solicitors, 8 Waterloo Place next the Bank of Montreal. I have £200 worth of war loan in the keeping of the Bank of Montreal. If necessary you could raise money on this to take you home to Canada. In Canada all my assets are in charge of the Royal Trust Co. I have there $1000 worth of Canadian War Loan bonds, some stock in a life insurance company and some titles to more or less worthless real estate. My life insurance with the pension should keep you from want provided the whole fabric of society does not collapse in case of our not winning the war. If anything should happen to me you will have about $12000 cash from my life insurance. I would strongly advise you to spend only what you require for your immediate needs and have the Royal Trust Co. invest the balance for you in good securities bearing a fair rate of interest. For Heaven’s sake do not be persuaded to invest it in some get rich quick scheme. A fair rate of interest on this to-gether with the pension, as I remarked, should bring in an annuity upon which you could live comfortably. I have not any outstanding debts either in Canada or England except one for the uniform I have just ordered from Cooper Gardner & Co., 22 Bury Street, St. James S.W., London.

Now do not become alarmed and think I am in great and immediate danger for I am not. I am merely expressing to you my wishes in the case of the worst happening. I am selfish enough to be glad we were married last winter even things do not turn out as we expected.

With the greatest love I am

Your devoted husband
Harold W.McGill

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Published in: on January 14, 2008 at 7:00 am  Leave a Comment  

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