France, July 3, 1918

Dearest Emma; –

Your letter of June 28 reached me this morning. I was sorry but not at all surprised to hear that a number of your nurses were down with influenza. I hope that you yourself, will succeed in escaping it.

I fear that I again forgot to answer your question re the Piccadilly Hotel. You know the place better than I do, and as you say it is very central. It would not be too noisey. As I said before any hotel that suits you will meet my approval. Be sure though to get a room with a bath. It may be that we shall be making a choice among the Paris hotels, for if in another month there does not seem to be any prospects of my getting away to England within a reasonable time, it might be really our best scheme for me to apply for Paris leave, provided always of course that I could get you over. I should make sure of that point before I applied for the leave. We should have to arrange some meeting place in Paris or Rouen, preferably the latter. There is certainly very little chance of my getting away until the leave allotment is extended very materially. Col. Doughty tells one that Mrs. Doughty is now expecting him to go on leave almost any day, but that he has no idea himself when he will be able to get away.

The weather is much cooler to day and the sky partially cloudy. I wish we could have a good rain storm. I had quite a long ride in an ambulance car this morning, going around to gather up the sick admission cases from the different units.

We had quite a treat for lunch to say, strawberries & cream, the latter of course being of the condensed variety. The strawberries must be later here than in England for these are the first we have been able to get.

So you refuse to send me a bill for the clothes you bought for me! There were a few other little things that I was about to ask you to buy for me but I shall certainly not do so unless you promise to send me the account.

You may be interested to know that on Dominion Day I wore a full turnout of the things you bought for me, shirt, collar, tie and even handkerchief.

Your loving husband
Harold W. McGill

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Published in: on April 16, 2008 at 8:00 am  Leave a Comment  
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