France, Aug 14, 1918

Dearest Emma;

Please expect & accept only a few lines to let you know I am safe and well, and think about you. Our mail has not come up for three days so I cannot acknowledge the receipt of any letters from you, but I know there will be a bunch when the mail is sent up.

I went on duty dressing, yesterday afternoon, but did not have much to do. One the patients was a German airman who had been shot down. He lived only a short time after being brought in. The enemy bombing planes were busy again last night but nothing came near us. Some big search lights have been brought forward into our area and I think these tend to keep our night visitors from hovering around much. They don’t like hanging around looking for targets when search lights are playing on them. The lights picked up several last night. The machines looked very pretty in the shafts of light, like huge white butterflies. We slept in our new funk pits last night and felt quite secure. There are two of us in the tent I occupy. We had two shallow trenches dug for our beds and our batmen lined these with oat sacking and ground sheets. They look quite smart. MacLean is getting some hay all cut ready for us.

Three of us last evening took a walk for a mile or two over the battlefield of last week. We did not find much of interest except a few dead horses and the bodies of some of the enemy who had been shot as they fled before our advancing troops. We also saw everywhere the trails left by the tanks as they went forward. The weather keeps fine and dry. There was quite a good moon last evening for about an hour after dark.

Margaret’s unit is now quite close to us and I shouldn’t be surprised if we were clearing to them to day or to-morrow. If so I shall try to get off for a few hours and go down on one of the cars taking down wounded. I could stay a little while and then come back on another car returning empty.

I shall send this to your new address as I did the one I wrote yesterday. My dressers take over the tables in 20 minutes so I shall have to close this up and get ready for work.

Your loving husband
Harold W. McGill

P.S. The feeling of victory is a wonderfully exhilarating thing isn’t it? N-B- we have too many padres about. They are a pest. I am very glad now we didn’t have one at our wedding.

H. W. McG

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Published in: on May 22, 2008 at 8:00 am  Leave a Comment  
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