France, Nov 30, 1917

Dearest Emma;-

Please excuse my writing to you on this military paper. Your 3 letters of Nov 22 & 24 all reached me together last night. I notice from your remarks that you consider some of my communications rather terse and to the point. I shall probably call to see you very few days after your receipt of this letter and you can say it all to me then. I am putting in an application for 14 days leave to begin on Dec. 7 and shall probably obtain it. I asked the D.A.D.M.S. how much leave an officer might be granted in order to get married and he replied that anybody that couldn’t get married in 14 days time had better remain single. So which is it to be? I shall probably be on my way to England before a reply to this letter reaches me.

Many thanks for the violets and for the rose which I am afraid I neglected to acknowledge. I still have it and consider it a beauty.

Mrs. Drysdale must be a lady of the very best type and I feel very kindly towards her because she has been so good to you. How long do you expect to remain at her home? Are you just naturally tired out or are you suffering from some actual illness? I am very anxious to know.

You speak in your letters of your worry about how hard worked I am. Place your worries away, for during the past few days I have not done enough to break Sunday. One reason why I think I shall get my leave is that things are very slack in our line now.

I intend writing to Col. Hewgill to day and ask him to look after my interests making what arrangements he can for me. You might have a consultation with him and get things going a little before I leave France. You see I am unable to take any steps from here.

Your lover

Harold W McGill

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Published in: on July 23, 2007 at 8:00 am  Leave a Comment  

France, Nov 25, 1917

Dearest Emma;-

I have your 3 letters of Nov. 16, 18 & 20 respectively. My mail has been reaching me rather irregularly lately and opportunities for my getting off letters have not been good. However from now on I hope to be able to write to you more often. Please do not worry and begin thinking there is anything wrong with me, physically or otherwise, when you fail to get a letter from me for a few days at a time.

It begins to look as though I shall not be able to get a months leave, for some time at any rate, but my turn for ordinary 14 days leave is nearly due and with luck I may be able to get away early next month. I shall not know for certain of course until near the date of my departure. Are you ready to go on with our little adventure during the two weeks or would you rather wait? Have you any idea where we could have you live after I return to France? You see there will not be much time for making arrangements and it will be well to have everything possible done before my leave begins. I have not written Col. Hewgill yet but shall probably do so to-morrow.

Am very sorry that Miss Reid is having such a hard time. Good night. Hope to see you soon again.

Your lover

Harold W McGill

Published in: on July 16, 2007 at 8:00 am  Leave a Comment